Video Gallery


Ayame (Iris Flower) Kabuki Style Dance

The solo is called Ayame, and the group dance is Yuki no Furumachi o. Details: Ayame (Iris Flower) Kabuki style dance, Classical, Yamatogaku music, Lyrics: Mikihiko Nagata, Composed by: Toshio Miyagawa, Choreography by Sachiyo Ito A sketch of early summer “Light rain vivid is the color of Iris flowers. Images of my adolescence, brushed by some one’s passing…” Yuki no Furumachi o (Premier) (2011) Composer: Nakada Yoshinao (1961) Choreography by Sachiyo Ito The dance depicts a winter scene where the incessant falling of snow is a metaphor for the ceaseless flow of memories. Embracing 30 seasons of prevailing Japanese dance in New York, this work is choreographed specifically for the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Sachiyo Ito and Company.


Yuki no Furumachi o

The solo is called Ayame, and the group dance is Yuki no Furumachi o. The dance depicts a winter scene where the incessant falling of snow is a metaphor for the ceaseless flow of memories. Embracing 30 seasons of prevailing Japanese dance in New York, this work is choreographed specifically for the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Sachiyo Ito and Company. Details: Ayame (Iris Flower) Kabuki style dance, Classical, Yamatogaku music, Lyrics: Mikihiko Nagata, Composed by: Toshio Miyagawa, Choreography by Sachiyo Ito A sketch of early summer “Light rain vivid is the color of Iris flowers. Images of my adolescence, brushed by some one’s passing…” Yuki no Furumachi o (Premier) (2011) Composer: Nakada Yoshinao (1961) Choreography by Sachiyo Ito


Sakura

Sachiyo Ito & Company dance to “Sakura,” the name of the old Japanese song that accompanies it. Sakura means cherry blossom, and is a favorite flower of the Japanese people. Choreographed by Sachiyo Ito to traditional koto music, this dance celebrates the beautiful cherry blossoms. The fans used in the dance represent flower petals blown by the spring breeze.


Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) (part 1)

Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) is a Kabuki dance, first staged in 1826. The section is the entrance dance. On a clear day in May wisteria are in full bloom. Nearby is a pine tree. The heroine, a maiden with a spring of wisteria was inspired by a famous drawing called ohtsu-e. The young maiden represents a spirit of wisteria- and lovelorn emotions, and the pine tree is the beloved one the wisteria longs for.


Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) (part 2)

Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) is a Kabuki dance, first staged in 1826. The section is the entrance dance. On a clear day in May wisteria are in full bloom. Nearby is a pine tree. The heroine, a maiden with a spring of wisteria was inspired by a famous drawing called ohtsu-e. The young maiden represents a spirit of wisteria- and lovelorn emotions, and the pine tree is the beloved one the wisteria longs for.


Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) (part 3)

Fuji Musume (Wisteria Maiden) is a Kabuki dance, first staged in 1826. The section is the entrance dance. On a clear day in May wisteria are in full bloom. Nearby is a pine tree. The heroine, a maiden with a spring of wisteria was inspired by a famous drawing called ohtsu-e. The young maiden represents a spirit of wisteria- and lovelorn emotions, and the pine tree is the beloved one the wisteria longs for.


Mitsumen Komori (part 1)

This Kabuki Dance was originally staged in 1829. A nursemaid is on her way home from a shrine festival, carrying a baby, and also three masks tied to a branch, which she bought at a festival. As it is such a beautiful spring day, she decides to play under the full-blown cherry blossoms. After putting the baby to sleep, she collects flower petals and enjoys bouncing a ball. …


Mitsumen Komori (part 2)

… But the baby starts to cry. She tries to lull the crying baby to sleep with a story of Okame. Okame is a young girl who performs a dance with a bell for a shrine festival. She encounters Ebisu, the god of good fortune, who in high spirits with wine makes an overture. …


Mitsumen Komori (part 3)

… Okame and Ebisu fight after she tells him she is marrying someone else. Meanwhile, at a nearby shrine, Okames other suitor Hyottoko, a happy man, prays that his love for Okame is fulfilled.


Dojoji Story: Dojoji 2002 (1)

Dojoji 2002 is a contemporary interpretation of the Dojoji story, featuring the vengeful spirit of a girl who had been rejected by a monk, created in 2002. The Dojoji legend, is one that has been prevalent in the dances and dramas of Japan since the 11th century and has created a dance and drama genre called Dojoji-mono. The story describes the unrequited love of a woman for a monk; being rejected, the woman turns herself from a beautiful girl into a demonic serpent who chases the monk. As the monk takes refuge in the Dojojitemple, the woman destroys both him and the temple bell, (inside which the monk is hiding) by burning them to ashes. The bell serves as a symbol of the woman’s desire, longing, passion, anger, and eventual self-destruction.


Dojoji Story: Dojoji 2002 (2)

Dojoji 2002 is a contemporary interpretation of the Dojoji story, featuring the vengeful spirit of a girl who had been rejected by a monk, created in 2002. The Dojoji legend, is one that has been prevalent in the dances and dramas of Japan since the 11th century and has created a dance and drama genre called Dojoji-mono. The story describes the unrequited love of a woman for a monk; being rejected, the woman turns herself from a beautiful girl into a demonic serpent who chases the monk. As the monk takes refuge in the Dojojitemple, the woman destroys both him and the temple bell, (inside which the monk is hiding) by burning them to ashes. The bell serves as a symbol of the woman’s desire, longing, passion, anger, and eventual self-destruction.


Dojoji Story: Dojoji 2002 (3)

Dojoji 2002 is a contemporary interpretation of the Dojoji story, featuring the vengeful spirit of a girl who had been rejected by a monk, created in 2002. The Dojoji legend, is one that has been prevalent in the dances and dramas of Japan since the 11th century and has created a dance and drama genre called Dojoji-mono. The story describes the unrequited love of a woman for a monk; being rejected, the woman turns herself from a beautiful girl into a demonic serpent who chases the monk. As the monk takes refuge in the Dojojitemple, the woman destroys both him and the temple bell, (inside which the monk is hiding) by burning them to ashes. The bell serves as a symbol of the woman’s desire, longing, passion, anger, and eventual self-destruction. Scene 5. Sangha. Music: Ecophony gaia and Osore-zan by Shoji Yamashiro. Scene 6. Destruction.. Music: Ecophony gaia and Osore-zan by Shoji Yamashiro.


Dojoji Story: Dojoji 2002 (4)

Dojoji 2002 is a contemporary interpretation of the Dojoji story, featuring the vengeful spirit of a girl who had been rejected by a monk, created in 2002. The Dojoji legend, is one that has been prevalent in the dances and dramas of Japan since the 11th century and has created a dance and drama genre called Dojoji-mono. The story describes the unrequited love of a woman for a monk; being rejected, the woman turns herself from a beautiful girl into a demonic serpent who chases the monk. As the monk takes refuge in the Dojojitemple, the woman destroys both him and the temple bell, (inside which the monk is hiding) by burning them to ashes. The bell serves as a symbol of the woman’s desire, longing, passion, anger, and eventual self-destruction. Scene 7 (begun). Once again. Mendicant chant based on the Lotus Sutra, Kanzeon Kyo by Uttara Kuru.


Dojoji Story: Dojoji 2002 (5)

Dojoji 2002 is a contemporary interpretation of the Dojoji story, featuring the vengeful spirit of a girl who had been rejected by a monk, created in 2002. The Dojoji legend, is one that has been prevalent in the dances and dramas of Japan since the 11th century and has created a dance and drama genre called Dojoji-mono. The story describes the unrequited love of a woman for a monk; being rejected, the woman turns herself from a beautiful girl into a demonic serpent who chases the monk. As the monk takes refuge in the Dojojitemple, the woman destroys both him and the temple bell, (inside which the monk is hiding) by burning them to ashes. The bell serves as a symbol of the woman’s desire, longing, passion, anger, and eventual self-destruction. Scene 7 (concluded). Once again. Mendicant chant based on the Lotus Sutra, Kanzeon Kyo by Uttara Kuru. Scene 8. Raining.


Onatsu Kyoran (Onatsu the Insane)

“Onatsu Seijuro,” was based on Koshoku Gonin Onna (Five Women Who Loved Love), a novel of five episodic love affairs written by Ihara Saikaku in 1686. The tragic love affair of Onatsu and Seijuro, which inspired Saikaku, was an actual incident that occurred (ca. 1660 or 1662). The heroine, Onatsu goes insane after she learns that Seijuro was burnt at the stake. In this dance Onatsu wonders around, dreams of her wedding, sees a frightening fire, lastly prays and please the Buddha for her reunion. Mago (The Horseman): Shogo Fujima


DEDICATION

Dedication Performance with Ralph Samuelson on Shakuhachi and Sachiyo Ito – dance.


Kyo Ningyo (Puppet and Craftsman) – a Kabuki dance

The scene takes place in the house of Jingoro, a wood carver. Jingoro celebrates with wine for the completion of the doll, Kyo Ningyo, which is a replica of Umegae, whom he fell in love with. Suddenly, Kyo Ningyo becomes animated. Since the first person she sees is Jingoro – a man- she moves like a man. Though distressed at first, Jingoro then has the idea to have the doll carry Umegae’s mirror with her. For it is said that a mirror is a soul of a woman. Will the miracle work to make the doll become the beloved Umegae? Craftman (Jingoro): Jinsho Fujima Dancers: Jinsho Fujima Qingoro), Sachiyo Ito (Kyo Ningyo). Costume: Sachiyo Ito and Mariko Suzuki. Excerpted from a Kabuki play, Oyobanu Ude Hidari no Horimono produced in 1860, by Jisuke Sakurada III Music composed by Shikisa Kishizawa IV äs Yurushi no Iro Ayame Ningyo in 1842 Originally choreographed by Inosuke Nishikawa and Yoshizaburo Nishikawa


Kyo Ningyo (Puppet and Craftsman) (part 2)

The scene takes place in the house of Jingoro, a wood carver. Jingoro celebrates with wine for the completion of the doll, Kyo Ningyo, which is a replica of Umegae, whom he fell in love with. Suddenly, Kyo Ningyo becomes animated. Since the first person she sees is Jingoro – a man- she moves like a man. Though distressed at first, Jingoro then has the idea to have the doll carry Umegae’s mirror with her. For it is said that a mirror is a soul of a woman. Will the miracle work to make the doll become the beloved Umegae? Craftman (Jingoro): Jinsho Fujima Dancers: Jinsho Fujima Qingoro), Sachiyo Ito (Kyo Ningyo). Costume: Sachiyo Ito and Mariko Suzuki. Excerpted from a Kabuki play, Oyobanu Ude Hidari no Horimono produced in 1860, by Jisuke Sakurada III Music composed by Shikisa Kishizawa IV äs Yurushi no Iro Ayame Ningyo in 1842 Originally choreographed by Inosuke Nishikawa and Yoshizaburo Nishikawa


Kyo Ningyo (Puppet and Craftsman) (part 3)

The scene takes place in the house of Jingoro, a wood carver. Jingoro celebrates with wine for the completion of the doll, Kyo Ningyo, which is a replica of Umegae, whom he fell in love with. Suddenly, Kyo Ningyo becomes animated. Since the first person she sees is Jingoro – a man- she moves like a man. Though distressed at first, Jingoro then has the idea to have the doll carry Umegae’s mirror with her. For it is said that a mirror is a soul of a woman. Will the miracle work to make the doll become the beloved Umegae? Craftman (Jingoro): Jinsho Fujima Dancers: Jinsho Fujima Qingoro), Sachiyo Ito (Kyo Ningyo). Costume: Sachiyo Ito and Mariko Suzuki. Excerpted from a Kabuki play, Oyobanu Ude Hidari no Horimono produced in 1860, by Jisuke Sakurada III Music composed by Shikisa Kishizawa IV äs Yurushi no Iro Ayame Ningyo in 1842 Originally choreographed by Inosuke Nishikawa and Yoshizaburo Nishikawa


Gion Shoja

Music: Excerpted from Gion Shoja by Yoshiko Sakata. Choreography: Sachiyo Ito. Inspired by The Heike Monogatari (The Tale of the Heike Clan). “The sound of the bell of the Gion Temple echoes impermanence of all things. The pale hue of the flowers of the teak-tree shows the truth that they who prosper must fall. The proud ones do not last long, but vanish like a spring-night’s dream. And the mighty ones too will perish in the end, like dust before the wind.” – Tr. Paul Varley

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